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Kinnikinnick Native Plant Society

Focusing on native plants and conservation in North Idaho

Mission

  • to foster an understanding and appreciation of native flora and its habitats in the panhandle area of North Idaho,
     
  • to advocate the conservation of this rich natural heritage for future generations,
     
  • to encourage the responsible use of native plants in landscaping and restoration,
     
  • to educate youth and the general public in the value of the native flora and their habitats.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  About our logo:  Marilyn McIntyre, naturalist and artist, has created our colorful logo depicting the flower, leaves, and the fruit of the kinnikinnick plant.

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Current Newsletter:

  (Sept/Oct 2018)

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Holiday Cards

Click Here for a downloadable form

KNPS Presentations

The Kinnikinnick Native Plant Society in conjunction with Sandpoint Parks and Recreation have monthly presentations at the Sandpoint Community Hall, 204 S. First Avenue. The meetings are held from 9:45 - 11:30 AM. The meetings are held on the 4th Saturday of each month, January thru June and September thru November.

Saturday, October 27, 2018

Jack Nisbet “ The Leibergs on Lake Pend Oreille 1885-1907”
 
John Leiberg was a late-coming pioneer to north Idaho with a keen interest in native plants; his wife Carrie was an accredited physician who opened a doctor’s office in Hope to treat local families. Join us for a slide presentation that follows the Leiberg adventures around Lake Pend Oreille and beyond.
 
Spokane-based teacher and naturalist Jack Nisbet is the author of several books that explore the human and natural history of the Intermountain West. His books cover topics ranging from flora and fauna to histories of the map maker David Thompson and naturalist David Douglas. For years Nisbet has been befuddled by the variety and habits of our native biscuitroots, but he likes to look for them anyway. His essay book Visible Bones won awards from the Washington State Library Association and the Seattle Times. While researching David Thompson, Jack participated in canoe brigades, presentations, four documentary films, and a major museum exhibit.  The presentation will be based on his latest book The Dreamer and the Doctor.

 

 

Click Here for FUTURE PROGRAMS